Infant Mortality

A community with a high infant mortality rate has greater health concerns than a community with a lower rate. Infant mortality rates, which include any baby born alive who dies prior to his or her first birthday, are indicative of the overall health in a community. When babies are less likely to reach their first birthday in a particular community that has a higher infant mortality rate than the average community, there is a greater problem that needs to be addressed. Not only does it become imperative to address infant mortality, but the overall health and quality of life in general within that community.

Cincinnati in particular is experiencing an infant death crisis. The national infant mortality rate is 6.05 deaths for every 1,000 live births. Cincinnati’s rate from 2009-2013 was 12.4, twice the national rate. It gets worse. It was found that these rates are higher in particular neighborhoods; namely Mt. Auburn, Avondale, Price Hill and Walnut Hills. Rates in these neighborhoods dramatically surpass the national average by three or four times. As a community leader, it is my duty to intervene and collaborate with other community leaders in an effort to counter this issue plaguing our community. Here steps in Cradle Cincinnati, a community initiative established in June of 2013 aimed at ensuring every child born in Hamilton County will live to see his or her first birthday.

To learn more about Cradle Cincinnati and infant mortality in Hamilton County, visit our website at cradlecincinnati.org